Modernization of Yale New Haven
Children’s Hospital at Bridgeport – NICU

Categories: NICU Stories

Kristin’s Story

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Kristin and her husband, David, were parents of a healthy, robust 21 month old son. Now, pregnant with twins, they expected a few surprises along the way. However, delivering her twin daughters at 26 weeks was not one of them. Penelope and Lily arrived on July 23rd, weighing in at 2.2 ounces each, fighting for survival. Meeting her babies for the first time in the sterile, brightly lit Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Bridgeport Hospital, through the heavy glass of an incubator was not the introduction she was hoping for. It went against every instinct she had as a mother…so unnatural, so frightening.

Caring for her twins in the NICU was uncomfortable at best. She felt as if she always had an audience in the large open nursery. Suffering from postpartum depression, she seemed to be re-traumatized each time new premature infants were admitted. She kept reliving those scary moments.
The one thing that gave her hope was that she and her babies were receiving the best medical and nursing care possible. With the support of the encouraging and caring NICU staff, Kristin and her babies slowly made progress.
After 54 days in the hospital, Penelope was able to go home. Lily spent a total of 68 days in the NICU. They turned three months old on their due date. Both girls are doing very well, making a complete and happy family.
Every newborn, every family, deserves the quality of care – the chance for a future – that Penelope, Lily and their parents have received. But even the world’s best hospitals can’t maintain that level of quality into the future without the support of individuals who understand that there is nothing more important than the survival and health of our children.
Bridgeport Hospital Foundation is launching a campaign to modernize our NICU that will support its vision to offer the best in family-centered medicine and provide the best possible outcomes for the premature babies that have been entrusted to our care.